• WP2: Sampling protocols are ready to be used in each DRN! They will be used at the beginning of 2021 to assess biodiversity of microbes, macroinvertebrates and fish, and to measure local environmental variables in 20 sites scattered across each DRN.
    @B.Launay
    WP2: Sampling protocols are ready to be used in each DRN! They will be used at the beginning of 2021 to assess biodiversity of microbes, macroinvertebrates and fish, and to measure local environmental variables in 20 sites scattered across each DRN.
  • The WP3 team from University of Innsbruck works on setting up protocols for organic matter sample collection. Before sampling 6 river networks across Europe we give our ideas how to collect OM a decent test run in an Austrian river - cold, not dry at all and during Covid19-lockdown.
    @G.Singer
    The WP3 team from University of Innsbruck works on setting up protocols for organic matter sample collection. Before sampling 6 river networks across Europe we give our ideas how to collect OM a decent test run in an Austrian river - cold, not dry at all and during Covid19-lockdown.
  • @B.Launay
  • Within DRYvER we aim at generating a so far not existing impression on the chemical composition and diversity of particulate organic matter in six river networks. The tool of our choice is FTIR microscopy, allowing us to distinguish variously processed leaf litter particles, soil residuals and the occasional microplastic fiber. Tuning this microscopic method to efficiently achieve chemical fingerprinting for the many samples ahead of us in DRYvER is the lab challenge for the winter months.
    @G.Singer
    Within DRYvER we aim at generating a so far not existing impression on the chemical composition and diversity of particulate organic matter in six river networks. The tool of our choice is FTIR microscopy, allowing us to distinguish variously processed leaf litter particles, soil residuals and the occasional microplastic fiber. Tuning this microscopic method to efficiently achieve chemical fingerprinting for the many samples ahead of us in DRYvER is the lab challenge for the winter months.
  • WP4 team is busy setting up the conceptual basis for the modelling of ecosystem services provided by DRN and their values. This will serve as the basis for a forthcoming interdisciplinary workshop in the new year. The team is making itself familiar with the focal DRN, their commonalities and their differences and soon will be making a move in planning site specific activities
    @B.Launay
    WP4 team is busy setting up the conceptual basis for the modelling of ecosystem services provided by DRN and their values. This will serve as the basis for a forthcoming interdisciplinary workshop in the new year. The team is making itself familiar with the focal DRN, their commonalities and their differences and soon will be making a move in planning site specific activities

Introduction

Introduction for the DRYRivERS mobile application

Many rivers worldwide stop flowing and/or dry out, with over 50% of the global river network including drying channels. This percentage is dramatically increasing because of the global climate change. Many streams and rivers that used to have flowing water all year round are now completely drying out during some periods or just maintaining disconnected pools in the riverbed. For example, in Mediterranean-climate streams, the duration of drying periods that typically occur in summer are becoming longer, while in areas with more humid and colder climate, rivers and streams are now experiencing these drying periods for the first time ever. Despite having information on river drying events is crucial for maintaining biodiversity, ecosystem functions and the provisioning of ecosystem services to humans, most drying river networks (DRNs) in Europe are not yet mapped.

The aim of the DRYRivERS app is to enable citizens to collect information about drying events. With this field information, citizens will contribute to the mapping of drying rivers and will help to improve scientific predictions of the future impacts of climate change in these ecosystems.

At each spot, where you would like to record the status of a watercourse, the app will ask you to provide the following information:

  • Share the geolocation of the spot.
  • Take a photo showing the hydrological conditions reported.
  • Provide the hydrological conditions. You will need to report if in the river channel:
  1.      water is flowing (Figure 1),
  2.      water is present but not flowing and allocated in disconnected pools (Figure 2),
  3.      there is no water and the channel is completely dry (Figure 3).

The app already started mapping drying events in streams and rivers within the six European case studies of the DRYvER project https://www.dryver.eu/case-studies located in Croatia, Czech Republic, Hungary, Finland, France and Spain.

We hope you will contribute too by providing data from rivers all around Europe!


From Left to Right or Top to Bottom: Figure 1. River channel with water flowing. Onyar River (Spain). ©N.Cid. | Figure 2. River channel with disconnected pools. Matarraña River (Spain). ©N.Cid. | Figure 3. River channel completely dry. Albarine River (France). ©B. Launay.

Contact information

Núria Cid:

Postdoctoral researcher at INRAE- RiverLy unit, EcoFlows lab- Lyon (France).

nuria.cid-puey@inrae.fr

info@dryver.eu

For technical problems:

Andor Tamás

dev@dryver.eu